INNOVATIONS BLOG

NEW Self-reinforcing Heat Performance PA66 for Automotive Industry...

Posted by NOVATION Staff on Nov 17, 2016 10:28:37 AM

Solvay has at launched at K 2016 Technyl® REDx, a new heat performance polyamide 6.6 (PA66) integrating a unique “smart molecule” self-reinforcement technology.

Heat Performance Technology
Technyl® REDx PA66 – an innovative material, which builds on Solvay Engineering Plastics’ proven heat performance expertise, outperforms conventional specialty polymers in demanding thermal management systems, especially in the automotive industry. Dr. James Mitchell, Global Automotive Market Director for Solvay Engineering Plastics, said:
“Today, more than 12 million engines use Technyl® heat performance technologies. Our materials enable car manufacturers to overcome engine downsizing constraints, such as greatly increased temperatures and pressures. There is a need for new material solutions which resist the higher continuous heat stress of new generation engines without compromising on costs and performance.”

Features of Technyl® REDx
• Solvay developed Technyl® REDx PA66, a smart molecule material including a patented self-strengthening technology present in the polymer chain without affecting its structure.
• This brand new technology remains inactive during injection molding of car parts, leaving the material behaving like a high-flow PA66.
• During the vehicle’s use, the elevated temperatures activate the smart technology, leading to rapid cross-linking that boosts the mechanical properties far beyond their initial values.

Read More

Topics: Automotive

Recycling of Plastic Auto Parts Gains Attention...

Posted by NOVATION Staff on Jun 15, 2016 9:30:00 AM

There is a buzz about automotive plastics recycling these days, and I’ll bet that in the not-so-distant future we will hear about some of the advances being made. Last week I blogged about MBA Polymers starting up what appears to be the first production of PC/ABS pellets derived from shredded WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment). But the company’s claim-to-fame is its now five-year-old Workshop, U.K. plant, which is reportedly the world’s largest (annual production capacity of up to 176 million lb) and most advanced facility for recovering plastics and rubber from automotive shredder residue. Its proprietary processes reportedly use less than 20% of the energy needed to produce virgin resins. In a bit of serendipity, other news on this front emerged last week: SPI released its new report, Automotive Recycling: Devalued is now Revalued, which highlights innovative use of recycled content and achievements in zero waste in manufacturing, as well as promoting increased recycling of plastic automotive parts. At the same time, SPI noted the while automotive recycling is leading other industries—with 95% of automobiles recycled at the end of their practical life, the recycling of plastic materials in automobiles, is in its infancy.

Read More

Topics: Automotive